50th Anniversary – Tribute to a Great Woman

 50th anniversary today. Can’t believe Barb put up with me that long – slogging through mud and rain to visit mountain gorillas in Rwanda, bugs and leeches in Borneo rainforest, lions roaring outside leaky tent in Serengeti, grizzly bears cavorting 20 feet away in AK, sleeping in wet hammocks in Venezuelan jungle, miserable conditions in Siberia. You know, all the fun things. “This is another fine mess you’ve gotten me into.” video She makes friends everywhere Loves to party! Bails me out when I’m in trouble  LOVE YA LOTS,...

Elk attack. One third of tomato crop lost.

It happened at 2AM. In a well coordinated raid, an invading elk ate one of three tomato plants on the deck of Norton’s office. A positive ID was made from a bedroom window as the elk fled the scene. The elk, part of a gang, is suspected of being a tomato addict. There was collateral damage; one flower planter suffered eating wounds from other gang members. Earlier, the elk gang was seen casing the neighborhood (photo). Neighborhood elk alert has been raised from orange to...

Serengeti’s Most Important Critters

“Stop. Stop! Simama tafadhali,” I yelled. We were on a dirt track heading south from Lake Ndutu when I spotted it. Startled at my outburst, Joshua, my driver guide, slammed on the brakes and we skidded to a stop in a cloud of dust. The other two vehicles behind us, part of our group, also stopped. Everyone looked around, puzzled, for there were no animals nearby – no lions lurking in the grass, no gazelles or wildebeest grazing. Just empty grasslands rolling away to an infinity of sky. I got out of the vehicle and announced to all the photographers in my group that I was about to give them the opportunity to photograph one of the most important critters on these plains. They looked skeptical, glancing around and seeing nothing but grass. Not a photo op in sight. They exited the vehicles and as they gathered around, I pointed down at the ground. There, unfolding before their eyes, was a preposterous scene: a perfectly round, golf ball-sized piece of dung being pushed by a large black beetle. It was comical to watch as the scarab, using hind legs and balanced on front legs, pushed the ball in a seemingly aimless way, being diverted by grass clumps, stones, sticks and other impediments. Another beetle, offering no help whatsoever, was attached firmly to the ball and was rolled over and over as the first beetle pushed it about. The second beetle was obviously the foreman, we concluded, who probably was shouting, in unheard beetle language, directions to the pusher: “No, to the left. More. More. No, now go right you...

Sign up for our newsletter on topics ranging from conservation issues to photography tips and techniques and for updates on our photo workshops and tours.

You have Successfully Subscribed!